Style Glossary

Here at Page-6 we LOVE all of our customers, which is why we do our best to pick out a variety of adorable styles so that there's something for everyone! With countless customers comes countless styles, and with a variety of styles comes our new Style Glossary! Be sure to search our glossary with your fashion questions. 

 Style Glossary 

  • A-line: A cut of garment consisting basically of two A-shaped panels for the front and back, designed to give increasing fullness toward the hemline.
  • Accordion pleat: One of a series of narrow, evenly spaced parallel pleats with alternating raised/recessed folds set into cloth. 

  • Applique: A decorative feature, usually a cut out design that is sewn on to or applied to a piece of material. 

  • Asymmetrical hem: When a top or dress is not identical on both sides of a central line; unsymmetrical. 

  • Babydoll dress: A dress that has a waist line that is just below the bust and a loose, gathered skirt that ends above the knee. (Named after the film Baby Doll, (1956), in which American actress Carroll Baker wore a loose, short-sleeved dress with a high hemline).

  • Bandeau: A strapless top formed from a band of fabric fitting around the bust.

  • Basket Weave: A style of weave or a pattern resembling basketwork. 

  • Boat neck: A type of wide neckline on a garment that passes below the collarbone.

  • Batik: A cloth that has been died using the batik method: Hand dipped tie die originating thousands of years ago from Japan. 

  • Bell sleeve: Can be either long or short sleeve & flares towards the bottom. Bell sleeves end anywhere from the elbow to the wrist. 

  • Bib Collar: A popular term for this high collar is the Peter Pan collar. It is named after the collar of Maude Adam’s costume in her 1905 role as Peter Pan, although similar styles had been worn before this date. 

  • Bishops Collar: A long full sleeve usually gathered on a wristband & adapted from a bishop’s robe.

  • Bodice: the part of a woman's dress (excluding sleeves) that is above the waist.

  • Box pleat: A double pleat, with the material folded under each side. 

  • Breton Stripes: The striped Breton shirt as we know it today came into being shortly following the 27th March, 1858 Act of France which introduced the navy and white striped knitted shirt as the uniform for all French navy seaman in Brittany. The shirt was originally known as marinière or matelot. The original design featured 21 stripes, one for each of Napolean's victories.

  • Brodcade: A rich fabric, usually silk, woven with a raised pattern, typicaly with gold or silver thread. 

  • Buffalo Plaid: A broad checkered plaid pattern usually two colors. 

  • Bugle bead: A tubular glass bead used for ornamenting dresses 

  • Burntout fabric: Devoré (also called burnout) is a fabric technique particularly used on velvets, where a mixed-fibre material undergoes a chemical process to dissolve the cellulose fibers to create a semi-transparent pattern against more solidly woven fabric.

  • Bustier: close-fitting strapless top 

  • Cable knitting: a style of knitting in which textures of crossing layers are achieved by permuting stitches.

  • Cap Sleeve: A sleeve extending only a short distance from the shoulder and tapering to nothing under the arm.

  • Chain Link: Typically a piece of jewelry made of wire in a diamond-shaped mesh

  • Chambray: A lightweight clothing fabric with colored warp & white filling yarns

  • Chandelier Earring: A long, elaborate dangling earring, typically consisting of various tiers of gemstones, crystals, beads, etc. 

  • Chantilly Lace: A delicate kind of hand sewn lace 

  • Checkered: Having a pattern of alternating squares of different colors. 

  • Chelsea Collar: A small, close-fitting, usually flat collar with rounded ends meeting in front. 

  • Chevron: A line or stripe in the shape of a V or an inverted V; especially one on the sleeve of a uniform indicating rank or length of serve. 

  • Chiffon: A light, sheer fabric typically made of silk or nylon 

  • Clutch Coat: A coat that is clutched together with the hand or left to fall open to reveal waist line. 

  • Cowlneck: A neckline on a woman’s garment that hangs in draped folds. 

  • Crochet: A handicraft in which yarn is made up into a patterned fabric by looping yarn with a hooked needle. 

  • Crop Top: Casual garment or undergarment for the upper body, cut short so that it reveals the stomach 

  • Dart: A type of sewing coming to a point providing shape to the garment 

  • Distressed: Having stimulated marks of age & wear. So vintage. 

  • Dolman: A loose type of cloak with cape-like sleeves 

  • Drop Waist: A style of waistline on a dress cut so that the seam is positioned at the hips rather than the waist. 

  • Embossed: Carve, mold, or stamped design on a surface so that it stands out in relief. 

  • Embellished: Making something more attractive by the addition of decorative details or features. 

  • Embroidery: Embellished or exaggerated in the description or reporting of an event.

  • Empire Waist: Typically a dress will have an empire waist. The dress will have a fitted bodice ending just below the bust, giving a high waist appearance, and gathered skirt which is long and loosely fitting but skims the body rather then being supported. 

  • Eyelet: A small hole, for embroidery or ornamental affect. Also a lightweight fabric pierced by small holes finished with stitching and often laid out in flowerlike designs. 

  • Fedora: A low, soft felt hat with a curled brim and the crown creased lengthwise.

  • Felt(n): A kind of cloth made by rolling and pressing wool to create a smooth surface. 

  • Filigree: Ornamental work of fine (typically gold or silver) wire formed into delicate tracery. 
Synonyms -tracery, scrollwork, lacework 

  • Fit-n’-flare: A dress or skirt with a fitted bodice and a flared skirt. 

  • Flap Pocket: A flap that covers the access to a pocket 

  • Fleur De Lis: A stylized lily composed of three petals bound together near their bases. 

  • Flutter sleeves: A loose-fitting tapered sleeve falling in folds over the upper arm.

  • Flounced Sleeve: A wide ruffle sewn onto a skirt or sleeve. The skirt would have gathered edging at the bottom. 

  • Fringe: An ornamental border of threads left loose or formed into tassels or twists, used to edge clothing or material. 

  • Gingham: Lightweight plain-woven cloth, typically checked in white and bold color.

  • Glen plaid: (short for Glen Urquhart plaid) or Glenurquhart check is a woolen fabric with a woven twill design of small large checks. 

  • Grommet: An eyelet placed in a hole in a sheet or panel to protect or insulate a rope or cable passed through it or to prevent the sheet or panel from being torn. 

  • Grosgrain: A heavy, ribbed fabric, typically of silk or rayon 

  • Halter: Secured behind the neck & across the back, leaving the arms, shoulders, upper back, and often the midriff bare. 

  • Handkerchief Hem: A hemline of a skirt or dress formed by panels of fabric, which fall in points resembling the corners of a handkerchief. 

  • Harem Pants: Full, loose-fitting pants made of a soft material that is gathered in closely at the ankle or lower leg, typically worn by women. 

  • Hat Band: A decorative ribbon encircling a hat, held in position above the brim. 

  • Haute: French for “high sewing” or “high dressmaking” or “high fashion” refers to the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. 

  • Heather (heathered): Interwoven yarns of mixed colors producing flecks of an alternate color.

  • Herring bone: An arrangement or design consisting of columns of short parallel lines in one column sloping one way and all the lines in next column sloping the other way so as to resemble the bones in a fish with an organic shape. 

  • High Low hem: Also known as asymmetrical, hems that are higher in the front, or side, than in the back. 

  • High-Wasted: A high-rise or high-wasted garment is one designed to sit high on, or above, the wearer’s hips, usually at least 8 centimeters (3 inches) higher than the navel. 

  • Houndstooth: A large checked pattern with notched corners suggestive of a canine tooth, typically used in cloth for jackets and suits. 

  • Hourglass figure: In a woman with a true hourglass figure, the measurements of hips and bus are essentially the same, and the waist measurement is equal to less than 75% of either the hip or the bust measurement. 

  • Ikat: Fabric made using an Indonesian decorative technique in which warp or weft threads or both are tie-dyed before weaving. 

  • Infinity Scarf: A circle scarf that is continuous and goes without ends, which can be looped around the neck or draped around the arms. 

  • Inseam: Placed at or sewn to an opening in the seam of a garment, usually the side seam. 

  • Italian Pocket: The roots of fashion go back to 14th century Florence. Appearance became identity along with the Italian pocket. 

  • Jersey Knit: A jersey knit fabric used predominantly for clothing manufacture. It was originally made of wool, but is now made of wool, cotton, and synthetic fibres. 

  • Johnny Collar: A small pointed collar on a shirt, dress, bodice with a close fitting neckline. 

  • Jumpsuit: A garment incorporating trousers and a sleeved top in one piece, worn as a fashion item, protective garment, or uniform. 

  • Kangaroo Pocket: A kangaroo pocket is a type of pocket, usually featured on hoodies that is large enough to fit both hands into. The pocket is open on either side.

  • Key hole: A neckline that features a central hole, usually just below the collar bones. 

  • Kick Pleat: An inverted pleat in a narrow skirt to allow freedom of movement. 

  • Knife Pleat: A sharp, narrow pleat on a skirt made in one direction and typically overlapping another. 

  • Lace: A fine open fabric, typically one of cotton or silk, made by looping, twisting, or knitting thread in patterns and used especially for trimming garments.

  • Lamé: A shiny fabric woven with metallic threads, often of gold or silver.

  • Lapel: Folded flaps of cloth on the font of a jacket or coat

  • Leggings: Leggings are tight, form fitting trousers that extend from the waist to the ankles. 

  • Lobster Claw Clasp: A fastener that is held closed by a spring. The lobster clasp is opened or closed by holding a small lever, long enough to apply, then it is attached or removed from a short link-chain or a ring like structure. 

  • Low Rise: (of pants) cut so as to fit low on the hips rather than on the waist. 

  • Madras Plaid: A lightweight cotton fabric with typically patterned texture and plaid design, used primarily for summer clothing such as pants, shorts, dresses, and jackets. Fun fact: the fabric takes its name form the former name of the city Chennai, Tamil, Nadu, India. 

  • Mandarin Collar: A small, close fitting upright collar. Mandarin collars start at the neckline and typically rise vertically two to five centimeters. 

  • Maxi Dress: A type of dress that is long, usually floor-length, and made with soft free flowing fabric. 

  • Mid rise: Pants that sit at the waist & flatter your figure. 

  • Monochromatic: Containing or using only one color. 

  • Mother-of-Pearl: A hard, iridescent substance that forms the inner layer of certain mollusk shells, used for making buttons, beads. 

  • Mottled: Mark with spots or speckles of color 

  • No-slip strip: 

  • Ombre: A French term meaning “shaded.” Usually a multicolored stripe, with colors graduating from light to dark. 

  • Open Placket: A placket is an opening in the upper part of trousers or skirts, or at the neck or sleeve of a garment. Plackets are almost always used to allow clothing to be put on or removed easily, but are sometimes used purely as a design element.

  • Paillette: A piece of flittering material used to ornament clothing; a spangle. 

  • Paisley: A distinctive intricate pattern of curved, feathered-shaped figures based on a pine-cone design from India. 

  • Patchwork: Needlework in which small pieces of cloth in different designs, colors, or textures are sewn together. 

  • Peacoat: A short, double-breated overcoat of coarse woolen cloth, formally worn by sailors. 

  • Patch pocket: A pocket made of a separate piece of cloth sewn onto the outside of garment. 

  • Pencil Skirt: A piece of jewelry that hangs from a chain worn around the neck.

  • Peplum: A short flared, gathered, or pleated strip of fabric attached at the waist of a woman’s jacket, dress, or blouse to crate a hanging frill or flounce 

  • Peter Pan Collar: A flat collar with rounded ends that meet at the front 

  • Pinking: Cut a scalloped or zigzag edge on 

  • Pintuck Pleat: In sewing, a tuck is a fold or pleat in fabric that is sewn in place. Small tucks, especially multiple parallel tucks, may be used to decorate clothing or household linens. When the tucks are very narrow, they are called pin tucks or pintucking. 

  • Piping: In sewing, piping is a type of trim or embellishment consisting of a strip of folded fabric inserted into a seam to define the edges or style lines of a garment or other textile objects. 

  • Placket Neckline: A placket is an opening in the upper part of trousers or skirts, or at the neck or sleeve of a garment. Plackets are almost always used to allow clothing to be put on or removed easily, but are sometimes purely as a design element. 

  • Platform: Are shoes, boots, or sandals with an obvious thick sole. The plateau has mostly a strength of 3-10 centimeters. 

  • Pointelle: A type of knitwear or woolen fabric with small eyelet(holes that create lacey affect).

  • Poplin Weave: Also called tabbinet, is a strong fabric in plain weave of any fiber or blend, with crosswise ribs that typically gives a corded surface. 


  • Pagoda Sleeve: A funnel-shaped outer sleeve turned back to expose an inner sleeve & lining. 

  • Raglan Sleeve: Type of sleeve whose distinguishing characteristic is to extend in one piece fully to the collar, leaving a diagonal seam from underarm to collarbone giving the garment a relatively undefined look. 

  • Rhine Stone: An imitation diamond used in jewelry and to decorate clothes. 

  • Rick Rack: Braided trimming in a zigzag pattern, used especially as decoration on clothes. 

  • Rivet: Join or to fasten (plates of metal or other material) with a rivet or rivets. 

  • Romper: A one piece garment combining a shirt and short

  • Ruched (Ruching): A pleated, fluted, or gathered strip of fabric use for trimming. 

  • Ruffle: Ornament with or gather into a frill

  • Satin: Is a weave that typically has a glossy surface. 

  • Scallop: Ornament (an edge or material) with scallops 

  • Scoop neckline: A scoop neck is one in which the scoop-shape neckline is dropped significantly below normal limits. 

  • Seed Bead: A generic term for any small bead. Usually rounded in shape, seed beads are most commonly used for loom and off loom bead weaving. May be used as spacers between other statement beads in jewelry. 

  • SeerSucker: A light fabric of linen, cotton, or rayon usually striped and slightly puckered. 

  • Sequin: A small, shiny disk sewn as one of many onto clothing for decoration.

  • Sheath: A close-fitting cover for something, especially something that is elongated in shape. 

  • Sheer: A fabric which is made using thin thread and or low density of knit, which results in semi-transparent cloth. 

  • Shift: A dress that features straight lines and doesn’t hug or cinch the waist. Its silhouette is most iconic of the 1960s “mod” look, when it was worn by figures such as Audrey Hepburn. 

  • Silhoutte: The outline or general shape of the dress/tunic

  • Shirring: Shirring is a sewing technique, which uses multiple rows of stitches with elastic thread to create rows of gathers. Necklines and sleeves can also be done with shirring so that they will fit snugly, without sliding. 

  • Shirt Dress: A shirt dress is a type of dress that borrows stylistic accents from tailored men’s shirts. 


  • Slash Pocket: A pocket set in a garment with a slit for the opening. 

  • Slit Sleeves: 

  • Smocking: An embroidery technique that’s used to control the fullness of a piece of fabric. 

  • Space Dyed: Space dyeing is a technique used to give yarn a multi-colored effect bringing vibrant shades of color to fashion. 

  • Spare Pocket: Small pocket sewn hidden into a piece of clothing

  • Suede: Suede is a kind of leather with a smooth, velvet-like surface. The term was originally used in France to indicate a particular type of soft gloves impor

  • Surplice Neckline: A diagonally crossed neckline also known as a “faux wrap”

  • Sweetheart Neckline: A neckline on a dress or blouse that is low at the front and shaped like the top of a stylized heart. 

  • Tab sleeves: Fine button detailing on sleeves holding the perfect folded for rolled up sleeves.

  • Tassel: Free/loose threads or cords bound at one end & hanging free at the other, used as an ornament on curtains or clothing. 


  • Tent dress: A full loose-fitting dress that is narrow at the shoulders and very wide at hem, having no waistline or darts. 


  • Tieback: A decorative strip of fabric or cord, typically used as a decorative loop. 


  • Tiered: A distinction of layers that typically are designed in decorative rows. 


  • Toggle: A short rod of wood or plastic sewn to one side of a coat or other garment, pushed through a hole or loop on the other side & twisted so as to act as a fastener. 


  • Toile: Is a fabric, from the French word meaning “linen cloth” or “canvas” used as a decorative piece of art.


  • Trumpet Sleeve: A trumpet sleeve is an exaggerated flare sleeve 


  • Tulle: A soft, fine silk, cotton, or nylon material like net, originally used for making veils & dresses. 


  • Tulip Sleeve: A sleeve that is curved at hem and overlapping to give a petal shaped affect in front. 

  • Tunic: A loose garment, typically sleeveless and reaching to the wearer’s knees as worn in ancient times 


  • Turtle neck: A high close-fitting turnover collar used especially for sweaters. 

  • Tweed: A rough-surfaced woolen cloth, typically of mixed flickered colors, originally produced in Scotland. 

  • Twill: A fabric so woven as to have a surface of diagonal parallel ridges. 


  • V-neck: A neckline of a garment, having straight sides meeting at a point to form a V-shape. 


  • Velvet: A closely woven fabric of silk, cotton, or nylon 


  • Welt pockets: Welt pockets are a great option when you want to add a pocket to a garment without the added bulk of a pocket flap. For example, on a slim-fitting pants or the front of a blazer. 


  • Waffle Weave: Usually cotton or microfiber, woven in a way which makes it very absorbent. 

  • Quilted: made of two layers of fabric with some soft substance, as wool or down, between them and stitched in patterns or tufted through all thicknesses in order to prevent the filling from shifting.

  • Yoke: A yoke is a shaped pattern piece, which forms part of a garment, usually fitting around the neck and shoulders, or a around the hips to provide support for looser parts of the garment. 
 
 
 
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